top of page
Online Learning

Webinars

for continuing education

Register now or watch on demand!

Register for an upcoming NSWOCC WOC Institute continuing education webinar below, or watch one of the myriad of on-demand webinars located in the "Past Webinars" section at the bottom of the page.

 

Certificates of Attendance & Post-Webinar Survey

Those who attend a continuing education webinar live on Zoom will automatically receive a certificate of attendance from the NSWOCC WOC Institute within 48 hours. If you would like to receive a certificate of attendance for a recorded webinar, please complete the "Request a Certificate" form below, entering with the code included in the recorded webinar. 

We are pleased to inform you that effective October 18, in response to the growing success of our webinar series and the substantial increase in certificate requests this fall, we have introduced an automated system that will instantly generate and deliver your certificate of attendance when you request it through the online form. We are excited about this new development, as it means that you and fellow attendees watching webinars on-demand will no longer experience delays in receiving your certificates.

Upcoming Webinars

  • Healing is Believing: A Closer Look at Real World Applications of a Total Contact Cast (TCC) System in Offloading DFUs
    Healing is Believing: A Closer Look at Real World Applications of a Total Contact Cast (TCC) System in Offloading DFUs
    29 mai 2024, 19 h 00 – 20 h 00 HAE
    Click to learn more!
    Partager
  • Building Bridges: Multidisciplinary Approach to Advanced Wound Healing
    Building Bridges: Multidisciplinary Approach to Advanced Wound Healing
    mar. 04 juin
    Webinar
    04 juin 2024, 18 h 00 – 19 h 00 HAE
    04 juin 2024, 18 h 00 – 19 h 00 HAE
    Click to learn more!
    Partager
  • Improving patient outcomes in vascular surgery/groin incisions
    Improving patient outcomes in vascular surgery/groin incisions
    mer. 12 juin
    Webinar
    12 juin 2024, 19 h 00 – 20 h 00 HAE
    12 juin 2024, 19 h 00 – 20 h 00 HAE
    Click to learn more!
    Partager
  • Canadian Consensus Statement on the Management of Venous Leg Ulcers (VLUs)
    Canadian Consensus Statement on the Management of Venous Leg Ulcers (VLUs)
    lun. 17 juin
    Webinar
    17 juin 2024, 18 h 00 – 19 h 00 HAE
    17 juin 2024, 18 h 00 – 19 h 00 HAE
    Click to learn more!
    Partager
Past Webinars
Clinical Management of Infected Wounds: Antimicrobial Innovations
01:06:22

Clinical Management of Infected Wounds: Antimicrobial Innovations

Thursday, February 29, 2024 NSWOCC & WOC Institute Continuing Education Webinar: "Clinical Management of Infected Wounds: Antimicrobial Innovations" Objectives: • Review the damage cascade for infected wounds • Identify initial clinical interventions • Differentiate use of topical antimicrobial agents • Describe the antimicrobial actions of Anasept® Antimicrobial Solution and Gel, and Silverlon® Antimicrobial Dressings Presented by: Theresa Wilson, RN, BSN, CWON, FACCWS, DAPWCA In partnership with MedTech Solutions Group Clarifications to the Q&A by Theresa Wilson: While I received many great questions during and after the presentation entitled “(Clinical Management of Infected Wounds: Antimicrobial Innovations),” many of the questions involved the use and outcomes associated with silver, Silverlon, and the effects on biofilm in chronic wounds, as well as comparative information between Silverlon and Cadexomer Iodine. So, I wanted to provide everyone with additional information, which I hope will be helpful to you when making a care decision for your patients with chronic wounds. The standard of care for the removal and control of biofilm worldwide is active debridement and the incorporation of advanced antimicrobial solutions and dressings to eliminate the recurrence. Due to the development of the EPS matrix, which provides a protective barrier to antimicrobials, the best way to ensure optimal removal of biofilms is an initial debridement to remove this barrier so the antimicrobials can be effective, and the biofilm infection is eradicated. The use of topical and parenteral antimicrobial therapy without wound debridement have had limited impact on decreasing biofilm infection, which remains a major problem in wound care. Current claims to manage wound biofilm infection rely on limited early-stage data. In most cases, the data originate from limited experimental systems that lack host immune defense. (Sen, Chandan K. Ph.D.; Roy, Sashwati Ph.D.; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S. Ph.D.; Gordillo, Gayle M. M.D.. Biofilm Management in Wound Care. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 148(2):p 275e-288e, August 2021. | DOI: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000008142) While many wound care companies want to make the statement that their products kill biofilm, the scientific evidence is simply not there. In a systematic review involving 640 articles, (Schwarzer, S., James, G. A., Goeres, D., Bjarnsholt, T., Vickery, K., Percival, S. L., ... & Malone, M. (2020). The efficacy of topical agents used in wounds for managing chronic biofilm infections: A systematic review. Journal of Infection, 80(3), 261-270.), revealed a huge disparity in the laboratory studies. In vitro testing accounted for 90% of all studies with these demonstrating a minimum biofilm eradication concentration that is unable to validate real-world utilization and outcomes. There is insufficient human in vivo evidence to definitively recommend any topical agent over another for the treatment of chronic wound biofilms. To make a comparison between silver and cadexomer iodine for the treatment of biofilms would involve a head-to-head, in vivo clinical study design including a mature biofilm, and qualitative and quantitative diagnostics – which currently doesn’t exist in a reputable and worldwide accepted protocol . There are multiple in vitro studies that demonstrate both silver and cadexomer iodine dressings exerted an antimicrobial effect against target species biofilms in several studies. So, the BEST recommendations I can provide for the eradication and control of biofilms is to begin with extensive debridement, followed by the selection and application of true antimicrobial dressings which sustain microbial control for the longest period, and, at the highest rate of delivery – which Silverlon dressings have been conclusively proven to provide, (Barillo DJ, Croutch CR, Barillo AR, Reid F, Singer A. Safety evaluation of silver-ion dressings in a porcine model of deep dermal wounds: A GLP study. Toxicol Lett. 2020 Feb 1;319:111-118. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2019.10.023. Epub 2019 Nov 9. PMID: 31715245.). If you are using a cadexomer iodine dressing and are experiencing good results – keep using it! If you are using it and the wound continues to stall – change to Silverlon – and vice versa. Don’t continue to use a therapeutic modality that is not producing the results you want and expect. Alternating therapies is another good way to stimulate an active healing response. But remember – DEBRIDE first!!
The role of the geko™ device in venous leg ulcers and Lower leg assessment
01:09:31

The role of the geko™ device in venous leg ulcers and Lower leg assessment

Wednesday, March 13, 2024 NSWOCC & WOC Institute Continuing Education Webinar: "The role of the geko™ device in venous leg ulcers and Lower leg assessment" Objectives - Recognize the role of blood flow in wound healing. - Describe the impact of the geko™ device on bloodflow to wounds. - Explain the results of the geko™ device venous leg ulcer randomized controlled trial. - Discuss the implications for the use of the geko™ device in clinical practice. - Identify the key components of lower leg assessment. Presented by: Dr. Michael Stacey MBBS, FRACS, Doctor of Surgery* Dr. Stacey is a vascular surgeon who came to Canada from Australia in 2014 as the Surgeon in Chief at Hamilton Health Sciences and Professor in the Department of Surgery at McMaster University. He completed his medical degree at the University of Western Australia, is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, and is licensed with the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. He spent 2 years working at St Thomas’ Hospital in London, United Kingdom, where he conducted research for his Doctor of Surgery degree (PhD equivalent). Dr. Stacey took on the role of Chief Medical Executive and Executive Vice President Academic at Hamilton Health Sciences in 2018 until mid-2023. He currently continues his clinical work in vascular surgery and is a consultant for hospitals and biomedical companies in the areas of clinical practice, research, and physician leadership. As well as his practice in vascular surgery of more than 30 years, Dr. Stacey has established active research programs in wound healing in both Australia and Canada. He was the first President of the Australian Wound Management Association (now Wounds Australia), and the founding Chair of the World Union of Wound Healing Societies. Dr. Stacey has a passion for advancing wound care for patients. He has previously established a multidisciplinary diabetic foot ulcer clinic and a venous leg ulcer clinic in Australia and is in the process of establishing a similar clinic at Hamilton Health Sciences. As well as his clinical practice interests, Dr. Stacey is also an artist, using mainly oil paint as his medium, and a poet. He has published poems in multiple anthologies and periodicals. Examples of his art and poetry can be seen on Instagram at michaelcstacey.artistandpoet * Due to unforeseen circumstances, Professor Keith Harding will be unable to participate in the webinar. His presentation will be covered by Dr Michael Stacey, a vascular surgeon based in Hamilton, Ontario. Dr. Stacey is also a global academic and clinical wound expert. In partnership with Perfuse Medtec Inc.
bottom of page